Thursday, September 4, 2008

Vintage Wyler Incaflex

Today I'm wearing this vintage Wyler from the 1950s or early 1960s. The "Incaflex" on the dial might or might not be the model name, but it definitely refers to the balance wheel anti-shock system used within. From an interview with Jean-Claude Biver: (a 30+ year watch industry executive who's primarily responsible for the exciting rebirth of the brand as "Wyler Geneve")

"Wyler became well-known in the past because of their invention of the Incaflex balance wheel with flexible arms that could help absorb horizontal shocks. This they used in conjunction with the more commonly used Incabloc shock that absorbed shock on a vertical axis. Now, when you have something that can deform on both the vertical and horizontal axis in the car industry, they call this variable geometry. Only Wyler had this because they had the patent on the Incaflex balance wheel. In 1956, to demonstrate the effectiveness of this system, Wyler took the watch to the top of the Eiffel Tower, placed it in a special container, and threw it off. When they opened the container, the watch was still working…"

More recently, Wyler drove a car over one watch and dropped another one from a height of 10 meters for the brand's launch in Taiwan. Wyler Geneve is definitely a brand to watch with exciting designs and impressive innovations. Unfortunately, they have equally impressive prices, so this might be the only Wyler I ever own. This watch seems to be typical of vintage Wylers with the Incaflex system, a mid-size case (about 30mm) and a stainless steel "waterproof" case. The design is quite understated, appealing more as a practical "tool watch" than a decorative accessory. This one has a unique stainless steel mesh band with stainless steel links that slide over it, and the two ends of the band overlap as you can see in the pictures below. This is most likely an aftermarket band. I wasn't really familiar with the Wyler watch brand before I saw this one (which my dad bought sometime in the last few years) but I'm glad to have it. The company has some interesting history and some exciting models now and coming in the future.














5 comments:

omegassociates said...

Interesting comments and superb photos.

I had a Wyler Incaflex watch once. It might have been a high school graduation present (1957). Arriving at Bryn Mawr College as a freshman that fall, I met a lovely young lady named Miriam Wyler. Her first-floor dorm room (Rockefeller Hall) was across the hall from mine. It turns out she was a member of that very same Wyler family. I hope she is alive and well.
Small world. Fine watch. Wish I still had it! Wear yours with pride.

Silent said...

My father received a Wyler Incaflex for his high school graduation in 1961. I have been wearing it for the last 10 years....not exactly a head turner at a board meeting, but I like it and it always is spot on in the time department. Love it.

drdeebs said...

I just purchased a Wyler IncaflexSS 1610-1023H. It is a 3/4 size watch that I have read was a favorite of WWII pilots. It has a 12 at the 12 position,with hash marks for the rest of the hour markers.It has a W on the crown and a cicular second hand dial at the bottom where the six would be. Does anyone out there have any possible production date info and any other info would be helpful. It keeps amazing time for a watch of this vintage. Thanks, Dave

junior greene-gons said...

I just came across a lady's Wyler Incaflex 610-3517, a very beautiful watch, does anyone know the date it was made? Im unfamiliar with these watches and could use the help at determining its value and date of make..Thanks...

junior greene-gons said...

I just came across a lady's Wyler Incaflex 610-3517 a very beautiful watch, can anyone give me a date it was made, im not so familiar with these watches..